Concerto in G major

Double Bass & Piano
Composer: Dragonetti/Nanny

Product code:

RMD1055

Publisher:

:

Recital Music

£7.50

Description

The ‘Dragonetti Concerto’ was first published in 1925 by Alphonse Leduc in Paris as No.23 of Edouard Nanny’s ‘Les Classiques de la Contrebasse’. For many years’ no one questioned its authenticity, but as more research into Dragonetti’s original works for double bass was made, concerns began to arise. Many of Dragonetti’s manuscripts survive in the British Library, thanks to Vincent Novello who donated them in 1849, three years after Dragonetti’s death and on Novello’s retirement to Italy, but there is no original manuscript for this work.

As bassists began to edit and perform a wide range of Dragonetti’s music it became clear that this concerto bore little resemblance to any of his other pieces. The work does, however, have many similarities to Nanny’s Concerto for double bass, also to his other solo works and even studies from his Method. Eventually, most people came to the conclusion that this work is not an original work by the great Venetian bassist but is by Edouard Nanny, but in the style of the late 18th-century.

With that in mind, this is still a charming and evocative work that has player and audience appeal and is very easy on the ears. Many of the challenges for the soloist are technical and, almost a century after its first publication, it is still as popular as ever. Published in 1925, the first movement was performed at London’s Wigmore Hall on 15 April the following year by Victor Watson (double bass) and Sidney Crooke (piano) and was described as a ‘Contrabass Concerto by Dragonetti-Nanny.

This edition includes a piano accompaniment for orchestral tuning.

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Description

The ‘Dragonetti Concerto’ was first published in 1925 by Alphonse Leduc in Paris as No.23 of Edouard Nanny’s ‘Les Classiques de la Contrebasse’. For many years’ no one questioned its authenticity, but as more research into Dragonetti’s original works for double bass was made, concerns began to arise. Many of Dragonetti’s manuscripts survive in the British Library, thanks to Vincent Novello who donated them in 1849, three years after Dragonetti’s death and on Novello’s retirement to Italy, but there is no original manuscript for this work.

As bassists began to edit and perform a wide range of Dragonetti’s music it became clear that this concerto bore little resemblance to any of his other pieces. The work does, however, have many similarities to Nanny’s Concerto for double bass, also to his other solo works and even studies from his Method. Eventually, most people came to the conclusion that this work is not an original work by the great Venetian bassist but is by Edouard Nanny, but in the style of the late 18th-century.

With that in mind, this is still a charming and evocative work that has player and audience appeal and is very easy on the ears. Many of the challenges for the soloist are technical and, almost a century after its first publication, it is still as popular as ever. Published in 1925, the first movement was performed at London’s Wigmore Hall on 15 April the following year by Victor Watson (double bass) and Sidney Crooke (piano) and was described as a ‘Contrabass Concerto by Dragonetti-Nanny.

This edition includes a piano accompaniment for orchestral tuning.

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EditorDavid Heyes
OrchestrationDouble Bass & Piano
Publishers numberRMD1055

Contents

About the Composer

Information on this Composer has not been entered yet.

About the Arranger

About the Editor

David Heyes (b.1960) studied double bass with Laurence Gray and Bronwen Naish, later at the Royal College of Music in London, and completed his post-graduate studies in Prague with František Pošta (Principal Bass, Czech Philharmonic Orchestra). He has given recitals and masterclasses in 20 countries over the past few years and has been a juror at a number of international competitions, three times as chairman. David’s collaborative work gained him a prestigious award from the David Walter Charitable Trust of New York for his pioneering activities as a soloist, teacher, publisher, and commissioner of new music for double bass and he works with composers throughout the world to expand the double bass repertoire by commissioning new music and by rediscovering forgotten ones. Since 1983 more than 700 works have been written for him, music from one to twenty basses and from beginner to virtuoso, and he has premiered ten contemporary concertos with orchestra. David began to compose in 2013 and has had music performed and recorded in 29 countries across five continents. He is a D’Addario Performing Artist and has recently commissioned a solo double bass from British master-luthier Martin Penning.